Construction comeback set to create over 200,000 jobs

CITB Industry StatsA resurgence of growth in the regions and nations is driving a strong construction comeback, which is set to create more than 200,000 construction jobs and expand the sector by up to 2.9%, year-on-year, according to new research released today by the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB).

CITB’s latest industry forecast, the Construction Skills Network (CSN) report, predicts an increase of over 8,000 jobs per year on last year’s forecast with the annual demand for workers increasing to 44,690.

For the first time since the downturn, investment boosts in housing, leisure and infrastructure will deliver growth in every region, casting aside perceptions of a recovery driven only by the South East.

The annual forecast also shows that:

  • The UK’s private housing sector is set to continue growing at a rate of 4.6% over the forecast period to 2019, with the commercial sector set to grow at the same rate
  • A resurgence of growth and employment in the north of England has the potential to create an economic power base in the region, with the North West set to grow by 2.5%, the North East by 2.3%, and Yorkshire and Humber by 2.3% annually, over the forecast period
  • The biggest regional growth will be seen in Wales, which is predicted to grow by almost 6% year-on-year and create as many as 5,320 jobs in the next five years
  • Scotland is expected to see a drop in growth from 2% to 1.1% over the next five years, as a result of completed infrastructure projects associated with the re-development of the M8 and the Commonwealth Games, but infrastructure investment remains at historic levels.

Steve Radley, CITB’s Director of Policy and Strategic Planning, said: “Our CSN forecast shows that construction is experiencing a major comeback – with a sustained period of growth set to make a positive impact on the wider economy.

“Leisure, infrastructure and housing are all driving growth, but this brings with it new challenges in meeting skills demand.

“Employers will need to pull every lever available to them to meet the skills challenge they face but government can play a vital role in giving them the confidence to invest in training for the long-term.

“CITB is already identifying future skills needs and working with government and industry on the talent pipeline. But to help it plan ahead, industry needs a clear commitment from all political parties in the run up to the General Election that infrastructure projects will be delivered on time and to plan in the next Parliament.”

“Government can also help employers to develop the next generation of workers by sending out a clear signal that it will make it as simple as possible for companies of all sizes to invest in apprenticeships.”

The Construction Industry Training Board is calling for:

  • Continued commitment from all parties to deliver the National Infrastructure Plan
  • Renewed focus on improving the quality and delivery of careers advice in schools to attract the next generation of construction workers
  • Government investment in the energy efficiency and retrofit market, given the anticipated future skills demand and the UK’s pressing environmental targets
  • Industry and government to back CITB’s industry-wide campaign to create clear and accessible pathways into construction for people from all backgrounds.

Simon Carr, Managing Director of Henry Boot Construction, Private Sector Board Member of the Sheffield Local Enterprise Partnership and incoming chair of the National Federation of Builders said: “After a period of decline for construction, it is reassuring to see a resurgence of growth in the north of England.

“Investment in infrastructure, leisure, housing and commercial projects in the northern regions not only has the benefit of creating thousands of jobs where they’re needed the most and boosting local economies, having a profound impact on the UK economy in the long term.”

Alasdair Reisner, Chief Executive of the Civil Engineering Contractors Association, said: “Our industry is working hard to deliver the vital infrastructure that underpins the rest of the UK economy.

“In the last year there has been strong growth in demand that must be matched by rising recruitment. Contractors are already ramping up activity to bring apprentices and graduates into the sector, creating new careers in offices and sites across the country.

“But we must match this by attracting back those who may have left the industry during the downturn.

“We hope that the prospect of a decade of investment to improve our national infrastructure will attract this vital source of knowledge and experience back to the sector.”

First Published on CITB’s Website 

Jobs boost for unemployed construction workers

The construction industry therefore has a significant role to play in the growth of local economies as the UK returns to growth following the recession.  The joint investment programme will support the need to address skills gaps in areas of opportunity to ensure that construction businesses can meet growing demand and contribute to local economic growth

According to the new initiative, £1m will be invested by both parties to support a programme of skills and training activity tailored specifically to meeting the needs of the sector in Greater London. The scheme was developed to support construction’s role in boosting the capital’s economy and directly address the growing skills gap in the industry.

BE Group has been procured to provide project management services for the Greater London Joint Initiative.  Providers have been signed to deliver the six development projects in Greater London.

Ixion Holdings and the Green Skills Partnership will be developing and delivering a programme of support to help 500 unemployed construction workers to re-enter the industry and ensure that valuable skills are retained in the sector.

The Construction Youth Trust and London Youth have been procured to develop and deliver a shared work placement programme for 100 NEETs (Not in Employment, Education or Training) while Bouygues will be providing bespoke support for clients interested in adopting the National Skills Academy for Construction’s Client Based Approach.

Shared Intelligence, Montpellier and a consortium comprising of BE Group, the FMB (Federation of Master Builders) and the London Borough of Croydon have been procured to deliver a range of specialist business development training for construction SMEs across Greater London while Emergent have been commissioned to conduct research to understand the potential for the development of construction SME cooperatives in the capital.

Janette Welton-Pai, CITB Sector Strategy Manager for Greater London, said:

“We’re delighted to have secured providers for each of the projects in this exciting initiative. We firmly believe the providers will bring real value to the construction industry in Greater London in the near future.

“We know that one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to skills and it’s particularly important in the current climate to ensure that any training or up-skilling is relevant. CITB looks forward to seeing the programme of projects get underway and make a difference for London’s construction employers and workers.”

The London scheme forms part of a wider Joint Investment programme being rolled out by CITB which aims to promote and develop local construction skills in key localities.  The construction sector accounts for 8% GDP and a workforce of 2.1 million across the UK.

The construction industry therefore has a significant role to play in the growth of local economies as the UK returns to growth following the recession.  The joint investment programme will support the need to address skills gaps in areas of opportunity to ensure that construction businesses can meet growing demand and contribute to local economic growth.

Harvey McGrath, Deputy Chair of the London Enterprise Panel, said:

“Much work has gone in to setting this programme up and I am very pleased that the six strands of training and support are now ready to go.  The construction sector is key to the success of London’s economy, which is why the London Enterprise Panel fully supports this initiative as part of a wider programme of activity that the LEP is leading in order to ensure London can provide the skills that the sector will need to deliver growth in the capital.”

CITB’s new majority women board – our view

Chrissi3-300x202

Published: 14.01.2015

This week CITB announced the line-up of its new board and I think it’s fair to say that not many people were expecting 5 of the 8 members to be women, but they are. The biggest points are that it is a surprise, it is unexpected and it is cause for comment…should it really be?

As ever we thought we would offer our perspective on the appointments, what they might mean and the questions they might raise. Did BIS (they made the board selections) get it right? Is this ‘PC’ pandering? What does this mean for the sector?

So let’s grab the proverbial bull by the horns cos I know a few people are thinking it…they told me so.

Is this all just ‘PC’ gone mad; shouldn’t it be the best person for the job?

In that sentence lies the problem itself – the presumption that the women appointed will not be the best person for the job. Even when we have a full board of men we never question their ability based on gender, so why do we do this with women? Is it because they are under-represented in industry? If so, surely those that make it to the top, despite their difference, will be extraordinarily capable. Personally I feel these questions act as a barometer for how far we have progressed; if we are undermining the ability of women simply by their presence in a way that we would not do with men, we have a far way to go.

kath fontana ‏@kathf48  Jan 13Kath Fontana

@CNplus: Women outnumber men on new CITB board http://bit.ly/1y8j55g ” great – looking fw to the day when suchlike will not be ‘news’

 

All the women are from HR – where are the construction women?

To be clear, Dr. Diana Garnham who is CEO, Science Council does not work in HR; rather her background is politics and war studies. That being said I understand the point that none of the women have worked in traditional technical construction jobs, or at least not so I could find on LinkedIn (I’m more than happy to be proven wrong here).

There are a couple of points here – firstly, that the question was not asked of the men – did they have previous roles in construction and if so how construction technical would that role have to be before it was accepted? If you did ask this and looked at the histories of the group members, rather than made an assumption – well done you. If though you presumed MD meant from a technical trade background, I don’t mind saying that is not always the case.

The second point is around what the industry needs; as a woman who worked in construction I do feel that it provides an insight that I would like to be represented on this panel. There is a lot of presumption made about the challenges faced by different groups in construction that varies from the actual experiences of those groups – without that representation, there is a risk that stories won’t be told and lessons won’t be learnt. In saying that, the opportunities for women in technical roles are challenging – this is a fact demonstrated by the lack of women nominated for the 2014 CIOB CMYA awards amongst other things.

I think the focus must be on what the board is trying to achieve, and at the moment where we are recognising that the task-based focus of the industry has led us away from understanding the needs of the people in the sector, it might just be that the HR perspective is needed. Without knowing more about the reasoning behind these decisions it’s hard to answer this point more exactly.

Rob Charlton ‏@spacegroupRob  4h4 hours agoIslington, LondonRob Charlton

“Could CITB not find some women in construction to join the board. The HR thing is still a bit stereotypical.”

 

Why is only gender represented; what about disability, race, religion, sexual orientation, etc.?

Firstly, you don’t know that it isn’t. If you only consider the diversity you can see you’re missing the point somewhat. I’ll agree the board is a touch pale, but that doesn’t in itself mean that ethnic diversity isn’t represented, just that you can’t see it. The same goes for disability, sexual orientation, etc. Also, in a group of 8 it’s hard to represent all things so some leeway must be given.

The reason gender is so important is that a good gender balance has been proven to have noticeable effects on attendance, punctuality, papers read in advance of meetings and reduction of ‘group think’. There is also research that indicates a greater return on investment from mixed gender boards.

What do you think?

Overall, I think this is good news; in the future of course I would like to see women from construction careers on the board, but I also want to see both men and women from non-construction careers represented too – having a viewpoint from outside of the industry pushes us further. If our work only looked at what construction has done historically we would not be able to make the leaps forward that we have. Using research and best practice from outside of the sector and tailoring it to the needs of this industry is an approach that we have found to work well.

I am hopeful that this board will help the industry refocus and better appreciate the needs of the people working within it, and if it takes half the board being from a background in HR to achieve that, then it’s ok by me.

Construction Marketing Awards 2014 Winner

We show benefits of diversity training

Chrissi3-300x202

Holding on to your best talent

The industry is currently struggling to attract and keep the right talent and this makes it harder to keep good staff and attract good subcontractors. Our products are designed to help you create working environments that your employees want to stay in and progress in, whatever their background.

By working across the industry as well as focusing on the structural challenges facing the sector such as late payment terms, along the cultural and personal ones faced by companies, the framework is much more than a business tool; it is a strategy for improvement across the industry. That means that it needs your support. By signing up to the framework and backing its vision for positive industry change, the momentum can influence clients, main contractors and government.

  • An action plan tailored for your business, written by industry experts
  • Access to an online upload system for assessment documentation
  • Behavioural assessment of your organisation

Chrissi McCarthy is managing director of Constructing Equality email patrick@constructingequality.co.uk

CITB reveals new ‘streamlined’ 8-member board

james_wates_310Nick Boles, the Minister of State for Skills and Equalities, today announced CITB’s new Board which will revolutionise how the Industry Training Board operates, increase diversity and put industry at the heart of decision-making.

The streamlined eight-member Board includes five women from across the industry and brings together levy payers and independent members from England, Wales and Scotland, who will be able to make swift decisions based on the industry’s needs.  They will be supported by a CITB Council with members drawn from across the built environment sector.

Skills and Equalities Minister Nick Boles said, “The new Board will have a major role in helping this dynamic industry develop the skills it needs to grow. “I congratulate all the new Trustees on their appointment and look forward to seeing them working with business and employers to address the skills challenges faced by the construction sector.

“I am particularly pleased to see greater diversity on the Board and hope that it encourages more women to consider a career in construction.”

James Wates CBE, who will Chair the new Board said, “The appointment of a diverse, smaller, industry-led Board  marks the next stage of a reform programme that will make us even more relevant and responsive to the needs and ambitions of the industry we serve.

“Our industry is facing challenging times and I am delighted that the Secretary of State has appointed a Board which fairly reflects  our industry – both in terms of diversity and representation from all three UK nations.

“As an organisation we have made increasing the number of women in the industry a priority and I am proud that CITB is the first Non-Departmental Public Body to have a Board made up of over 50% women.

“I look forward to working with our new colleagues to drive change and make a lasting contribution to our industry in the year ahead.”

The membership of the new CITB Board is:

 Chairman

James Wates CBE, Chairman Wates Group

 Employers

Maureen Douglas, Group HR Director, Forster Group Ltd. (Scotland)

David Harris MBE, Managing Director, WRW Construction Ltd. (Wales)

Karen Jones, Group HR Director, Redrow plc.

Maria Pilfold, HR Consultant and former Director of the Taylor Wimpey Group

Ray Wilson, Director and General Manager, Carillion Training Services

 Independents

Dr. Diana Garnham, CEO, Science Council

Frances Wadsworth, Principal and CEO, Croydon College

A FIRst class employer

CITB BE Fair FrameworkUK construction, infrastructure and design business Morgan Sindall was looking for external approval for the work it was doing around Fairness, Inclusion and Respect [FIR] when CITB introduced its Be Fair accreditation pilot.

“The timely opportunity to be involved in something industrywide was compelling”, said Samantha French, Strategic Inclusion and Community Manager.

“Taking the Fairness, Inclusion and Respect Be Fair accreditation will help make Morgan Sindall an employer of choice”.

“Morgan Sindall had had an ‘Inclusion Plan’ in place since 2011 and had been investigating the various equality frameworks on the market in order to achieve external approval for the work we do around equality, diversity and inclusion,” Samantha said.

Taking part in the pilot was time-consuming but ultimately rewarding, she said. Among other benefits she felt the accreditation would also support business development and tendering activities and the experience itself was gratifying.

Without doubt, Samantha felt the accreditation had raised the profile of the company’s success in this area both internally and externally, and has helped to ensure that inclusive practice is at the heart of what it does.

Morgan Sindall’s top tips for Be Fair accreditation

  • Ensure buy-in from all levels of your organisation
  • Communicate what you are doing and why
  • Use the advice and support available
  • Make sure you have a good team leader who has a passion to see it through

The full case study can be found on the CITB website

Addressing construction industry skills shortages – “North West leads the way on fair working practices”

caroline2For this week’s blog we thought we’d like to show you an example of the good news we’ve been able to tell the press about the companies signing up for Be Fair – there’s no question that there’s been a groundswell in the North West so far, but we are also signing up and talking to companies that stretch from Scotland to the South Coast or are local to areas from London to Yorkshire and Cambridgeshire to Wales.

It has been fantastic to see the interest and drive from the companies so far for being part of the move to tackle their skills shortages by demonstrating fair working and employment practices for all. And the thing I love about my job is that when I speak with any of the companies taking on Be Fair, no matter what their question, I usually have an answer to help them – after all, that’s what Be Fair is for and what we as Assessment Providers are here for…to help and support companies to be the employers of choice they deserve to be or to win the work they want.

 

North West leads the way on fair working practices

North West based contractors; Rosslee Construction, Emmanuel Whittaker, E.R. Williams and TMJ Contractors, have been amongst the first companies to sign up for the CITB Be Fair Framework. The Be Fair Framework is a construction specific action-plan that recognises fair working conditions, employment practises and behaviours leading to national accreditation.

This exciting and innovative framework is industry led, designed for the construction industry by the construction industry to promote a greater atmosphere of respect and to encourage best practice within the sector. North West firms are leading the way as some of the first contractors to embrace the framework, which is now being rolled-out across the construction sector.

Rosslee Construction, Emmanuel Whittaker, E.R. Williams and TMJ Contractors will be working with us at Constructing Equality Ltd. (the UK’s leading experts on equality and diversity in the construction industry), for assessment and support of the Framework, under licence from CITB. Our Be Fair Service Manager, Caroline Gee, said:

“We are very excited to be working with these local companies on Be Fair as some of the first contractors to lead the way for the construction industry in demonstrating they are fair employers and the kind of company people want to work for. The Be Fair Framework was successfully piloted nationwide over the last year, and has been a catalyst for business development for the companies who have taken part.”

Nine North West companies gained accreditation through taking part in the 2013 pilot; Cull Dry Lining and Plastering Ltd, Highwire Limited, Holloway Cook Associates Ltd, ISG plc (North West Region), MAC Roofing, Penny Lane Builders Ltd, Southport Gate, The Sovini Group (One Vision Housing), and Walter Carefoot and Sons Ltd.

Companies taking on the CITB Be Fair Framework and wishing to use Constructing Equality Ltd as their licensed provider for assessment can sign up directly through Constructing Equality Ltd or can select them at the registration point with CITB. Companies in-scope to CITB can currently take advantage of a £1000 incentive for accrediting under the framework.

Further information on Be Fair can be found on our website.

http://constructingequality.co.uk/befairframework/

 

To see what companies who have used us as their provider say, visit our testimonials page

http://constructingequality.co.uk/about-us/testimonials/

 

Be Fair articles

Considerate Constructors Scheme http://www.ccscheme.org.uk/index.php/citb-s-be-fair-framework

Institute of Historic Building Conservation http://ihbconline.co.uk/newsachive/?p=7875

Project Scotland http://www.projectscot.com/2014/04/citb-celebrates-diversity-with-new-industry-award-given-to-graham/

Building Contractors Training Group http://www.bctg.uk.com/macform-fair-accreditation/

 

For further information and details companies taking on Be Fair can contact Constructing Equality Ltd on 0151 706 8132 or via Patrick@constructingequality.co.uk

Manchester site hoardings slammed as sexist

 

Screen-Shot-2014-11-05-at-07_08_43The Construction Industry Training Board has slammed site hoardings at a new Manchester hotel as “demeaning” to women.

CITB Fairness,Inclusion and Respcet Manager Kate Lloyd condemned the hoarding around the Malmaison site as “depressing and highly insulting”.

Lloyd’s comments follows criticism from writer Jeanette Winterson, who compared pictures of a model holding power tools to those of “soft-porn babes”.

A Malmaison spokesman told the BBC  it was “meant to be a bit of fun”.

But Lloyd said the images on the hoarding “only serve to set us back”.

She added: “The CITB has for years been challenging stereotypes around women in the industry and trying to encourage females of all ages to consider careers in the sector.”

She said 12% of the construction workforce were women, of whom 1% worked in manual trades.

Lloyd said: “We are missing out on a huge range of talent and skills that the industry would benefit from because construction is still largely seen as a ‘job for the boys’”

Winterson wrote in the Guardian about her “outrage” at seeing the “Mal at Work” hoarding, when staying at the city centre hotel last week.

She said: “Women at work seems to mean wearing a strapless dress and full makeup while staring longingly at a drill that presumably doubles as a vibrator.”

A male model also features on the Malmaison hoarding in Manchester

Winterson said: “He’s all muscle and sweat. He’s a hunk, sure, but the visual message he offers is not confusing to men.

“He’s about power and prowess, muscle and machismo. The hard-hat babes send out a message that aligns with male fantasy not female reality. And that’s a problem.”

The spokesman for the hotel chain said it was “meant to be a bit of fun with both men and women depicted to highlight our construction”.

“No offence was meant and we apologise if it’s been taken the wrong way,” he said.

“It’s made a lot of people smile and not too many frown.”

First Published in Construction Enquirer 

CITB 50th Birthday Pride of Construction Awards

The CITB has just turned 50 and to mark this achievement the Pride of Construction Awards were staged to celebrate individuals and companies who represent the very best of the sector. We were fortunate enough be invited along to the New Pictureawards which were an invitation-only event, and thought we might reflect on them from our perspective regarding fairness, inclusion and respect.

The first thing we should probably acknowledge is our bias, given that James Wates in his address spoke about the CITB Be Fair framework and its potential as a tool to change cultures and behaviours in the sector. It was not something we had been expecting to hear so we were more than pleasantly surprised, especially since it meant that afterwards there was a large number of contractors, clients, editors and CITB staff all wanting to talk about the framework’s potential and the credibility given to it by the mention in a key-note address.

For those of you who haven’t heard about the framework you can find out more here.

We felt the event did the industry proud, in the look and organisation (the food was amazing and the service was some of the best I’ve seen and I spent 8 years waiting-on as silver service), as well as the overall message and group categories. Those who spoke gave an impression of the sector that was professional, innovative and positive.

The awards given reflected a wide section of society (wider than industry stats it could be argued) and it was a delight to see so many very proud faces. We also felt having worked with some of the companies that won awards that there had been fairness in the judging and that small companies, who work so hard to make their businesses a success, were recognised alongside the larger organisations.  My favourite point of the evening was that The Mirror sponsored the Pride of Construction award was awarded to people who were currently working on site.

Overall this event was a very positive one and one of the best I have been to in industry with regards to fairness, inclusion and respect, we do though feel in the interest of progress we should outline where it could improve.

Now, no event will ever be perfect with regards to fairness, inclusion and respect – it’s a massive and very complicated area that changes over time which means that there has to be a focus on what it is reasonably practicable to do.  And I should add, this is not a bad thing and as long as you are addressing the biggest and most impactful challenges and you are generally progressing.

It is important though that we consider where we can improve;I will openly admit that even as an expert in equality I get things wrong and therefore hope people see these comments not as a criticism but rather as helpful advice when considering their own events.

There are a couple of things we could pick up on that aren’t that unusual in the sector such as the judging panel being entirely white male, all of the awards being awarded by men or the disproportionate number of black serving staff. Now before the cries of tokenism start let’s just think about why this is important.

Consider you are a young black man (if you are this will be easy), early in your career and looking at where you can go in the sector. There is a strong but subtle message that comes across when people who are visually similar to you are not represented at a higher level, but are abundant in a serving role.

I would imagine this wouldn’t be the reason people walk away from the industry, but if you do not find the same opportunities within their careers or face discrimination on the grounds of race then you may look to awards like this, or at the leaders of the sector, and wonder if the lack of representation is something that should inform your career decisions. The fact that the most prominent black person at the awards worked in another sector may only add to that narrative.

Solutions – Consider the mix of people in prominent positions and any message this may send to groups you are targeting in the sector. If we don’t send a clear message that there is a route to progress in the industry, talented people will walk away from the sector taking their skills and talent with them.

Solution – If the reason you have predominant group types in high profile positions is because you cant find a mix, don’t see this as a response – consider this an important challenge to be understood. Why do all of your key people reflect one section of society? How can you ensure the best, not just the similar,to rise to the top? Implement mentoring programmes, strong recruitment and progression practice and learn to appreciate that we promote in our own image. Without considering these things more carefully we may be compelled to accidently positively discriminate for white men – we need to open up the field.

We’ll leave you with a huge “Well done!” to the team at CITB who organised the awards in-house – I feel that in many ways this event made us very proud to be part of construction.

Construction Industry Shows Support at Liverpool Pride 2014

PrintRepresentatives of several major construction industry organisations will be showing their support for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community by attending this year’s Liverpool Pride celebrations.

The Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) will be among the organisations attending the event, along with AECOM and ISG who are both involved in the current £40 million Liverpool Exhibition Centre project on the waterfront. Leading UK construction firm Morgan Sindall, and the cutting edge Space Architects will also be in attendance.

Liverpool-based company Constructing Equality Ltd – the UK’s leading experts on Equality & Diversity in the construction industry – was behind coordinating the efforts of all these organisations to be present, ensuring that construction will have a strong presence on the day.

Chrissi McCarthy, Managing Director of Constructing Equality Ltd, said: “There was a really great response when we started to get the companies together for Liverpool Pride. It seemed like they all wanted to get involved, and represent the industry at events like this, and had resources set aside to make a splash on the day. Hopefully this will demonstrate to the LGBT community that construction has started to move on from the old fashioned image often portrayed”

The construction industry is keen to shed its out-dated image as having a stereotypical, macho, ‘jobs-for-the-boys’, culture and to demonstrate that equality and diversity are very much the current way forward in their business practices. To add weight to this drive, the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) has recently launched their Be Fair Framework, designed to provide guidance and accreditation for companies within the industry who wish to demonstrate their commitment to this agenda. Constructing Equality Ltd is the first company licensed as providers for assessing companies on this framework.

Kate Lloyd, CITB’s Fairness, Inclusion and Respect Manager, commented: “Be Fair was put together to highlight the importance of Fairness, Inclusion and Respect in construction. Its aim is to provide a straightforward route for organisations to take to address some of the issues that the industry, its employees and customers are currently facing.

“As an industry, we need to show that we embrace diversity – by attending events like Liverpool Pride, more people will get to see the range of careers available and hopefully consider coming to work in our exciting sector.”

Sam French, Strategic Inclusion and Community Manager, says: “Morgan Sindall is a UK construction, infrastructure and design business with a network of local offices and we’re passionate about supporting the communities around the UK in which we work. That’s why we’re proud to be present at Liverpool Pride. What’s more, we’re also really keen to promote construction as a career of choice, so I’d like to encourage anyone who is interested in finding out more about the industry to talk to us.”

Those wishing to visit the construction industry representatives can find them in the family area at the Pier Head after 12pm where there will be construction based games and activities for the family to enjoy.