It’s Just What We Do” – The Importance of Recognising and Sharing Inclusivity Best Practice On-site.

DSC_0121_100457Since it was across the way, and since ISG kindly offered, we popped over to the Liverpool Exhibition Centre to see how they were addressing fairness, inclusion and respect at site level.

“Scrap ‘near miss’; it’s ‘hazard recognition’” – ‘Near miss’ holds connotations of blame. ‘Hazard recognition’ takes on an entirely different tone; it suggests the person recognising the hazard possessed enough skill to recognise the problem and had been positive in their action. We would say that the behavioural implication of the words has a vast impact on individuals feeling ‘ok’ to report challenges in their environment in a way that makes them feel respected.

Green, Amber and Red – The use of yellow and red cards is not new in the sector; we also advise them for use when challenging negative behaviour. Where ISG have taken this a step forward is the introduction of a green card to reward positive actions from site staff. If you get a green card, your name goes into a hat and every month the winner gets £50. We feel that the approach to fairness, inclusion and respect should start here – learning the valuable lessons from past work in the sector.

NI Numbers to check ‘right to work’ – Gang–mastering is a problem across the sector, and knowing who has a right to work can be problematic. In order to ensure people are not taken advantage of we need to address this as a matter of urgency. ISG have started down this path by collecting the NI numbers of people working on site, this allows them to match up to their CSCS cards and ensure they are registered to work.

Taken from the blog section of the Constructing Equality Ltd website

North West Mentor Scheme

ISGLogo_124758A workplace mentoring scheme, titled ‘The Learner Voice’, was piloted in the North West. ISG participated in the scheme with five team members supporting the initiative, which is a partnership between the Construction Industry Council (CIC) North-West Regional Committee, the Higher Education Academy and CITB.

A consortium of universities in the North West agreed to take part in the scheme which aims to match 2nd year Built Environment undergraduates with construction industry professionals who have successfully built careers in their chosen fields.

Students at four universities were mentored. The partnerships were suggested on the experience that each representative could offer, and also linked in to where each mentor was brought up, to add extra relevance.

Richard Wynne was studying for a BSc (Hons) in Construction Management at Liverpool John Moores University, and had regular meetings, discussing topics including Risk Assessment and Method Statements (RAMS), forms of procurement variation management and the overall construction market.

Richard commented: “It has been great to get some support and guidance from somebody working in construction, offering an insight into how the industry really works. Gary’s knowledge and use of real world examples has given me a better understanding of some key areas, and this will certainly help in making the transition from study to the workplace.”

ISG will continue to participate in the scheme and other areas are now also looking to roll out the scheme.

Construction Industry Shows Support at Liverpool Pride 2014

PrintRepresentatives of several major construction industry organisations will be showing their support for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community by attending this year’s Liverpool Pride celebrations.

The Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) will be among the organisations attending the event, along with AECOM and ISG who are both involved in the current £40 million Liverpool Exhibition Centre project on the waterfront. Leading UK construction firm Morgan Sindall, and the cutting edge Space Architects will also be in attendance.

Liverpool-based company Constructing Equality Ltd – the UK’s leading experts on Equality & Diversity in the construction industry – was behind coordinating the efforts of all these organisations to be present, ensuring that construction will have a strong presence on the day.

Chrissi McCarthy, Managing Director of Constructing Equality Ltd, said: “There was a really great response when we started to get the companies together for Liverpool Pride. It seemed like they all wanted to get involved, and represent the industry at events like this, and had resources set aside to make a splash on the day. Hopefully this will demonstrate to the LGBT community that construction has started to move on from the old fashioned image often portrayed”

The construction industry is keen to shed its out-dated image as having a stereotypical, macho, ‘jobs-for-the-boys’, culture and to demonstrate that equality and diversity are very much the current way forward in their business practices. To add weight to this drive, the Construction Industry Training Board (CITB) has recently launched their Be Fair Framework, designed to provide guidance and accreditation for companies within the industry who wish to demonstrate their commitment to this agenda. Constructing Equality Ltd is the first company licensed as providers for assessing companies on this framework.

Kate Lloyd, CITB’s Fairness, Inclusion and Respect Manager, commented: “Be Fair was put together to highlight the importance of Fairness, Inclusion and Respect in construction. Its aim is to provide a straightforward route for organisations to take to address some of the issues that the industry, its employees and customers are currently facing.

“As an industry, we need to show that we embrace diversity – by attending events like Liverpool Pride, more people will get to see the range of careers available and hopefully consider coming to work in our exciting sector.”

Sam French, Strategic Inclusion and Community Manager, says: “Morgan Sindall is a UK construction, infrastructure and design business with a network of local offices and we’re passionate about supporting the communities around the UK in which we work. That’s why we’re proud to be present at Liverpool Pride. What’s more, we’re also really keen to promote construction as a career of choice, so I’d like to encourage anyone who is interested in finding out more about the industry to talk to us.”

Those wishing to visit the construction industry representatives can find them in the family area at the Pier Head after 12pm where there will be construction based games and activities for the family to enjoy.

Best practice for supporting women in construction roles

ISG approached Constructing Equality Ltd to develop a two-day course to support female managers in develCase Study Threeoping an understanding of how they are perceived by, and relate to, others in the workplace. The programme was designed to look at how they could strengthen their positions and increase their effectiveness as managers, as well as become future leaders in the business.

Initially ISG felt that its female managers were robust enough and comfortable in their positions so was unsure as to how the course would be received. However they were inundated with positive feedback from course attendees and a number of women across the business have since expressed their interest in attending any future courses.

Aims –

To develop an understanding of workplace perception within female managers.

To increase confidence and effectiveness within female managers to aspire to be future leaders in business.

To help individuals recognise and overcome potential barriers so that they can develop and excel as leaders.

Approach –     

Designed specifically to meet the demands of life in construction as a woman, the course covered the essentials of leadership, progression and communication using examples, systems and experiences that enabled participants to apply their understanding to their own personal roles and achieve their ambitions.

Outcome –

ISG acknowledged that helping female managers to understand more about how they relate to their workplace and how their workplace relates to them would increase effectiveness in their roles and their commitment to the organisation; improving motivation, morale and, ultimately, productivity. They also recognised that there was a very strong need and desire for this type of training when they saw the strength of the feedback, as well as the take-up.

Testimonial –

The women who attended the two-day programme were unanimous in their resoundingly positive response to the course and the empowerment they felt following their experiences:

“I think this course was excellent, it really opened my eyes to opportunities as well as potential obstacles. It should be given a wider roll out”

“Made me reflect on my current position and think about my future and how I can get there through behavioural changes and confidence building”

“The whole course was very informative, lots to take away and digest”

“I now understand that my actions may not necessarily be perceived in the way I intend, but I now I have the tools to remedy this”

Fixing the leaky pipe; A case study of best practice for companies supporting women in construction roles.

Group DiscussionGroup Shot

 

This week’s blog is brought to you in the form of a case study from one of our Partners ISG,  who are an international construction services company.’ We think they are best placed to tell you about how they are proactively helping their workforce.

ISG approached Constructing Equality Ltd to develop a two day course to support female managers in developing an understanding of how they are perceived by, and relate to, others in the workplace. The programme was designed to look at how they could strengthen their positions and increase their effectiveness as managers, as well as become future leaders in the business.

Initially ISG felt that it’s female managers were robust enough and comfortable in their positions so was unsure as to how the course would be received. However they were inundated with positive feedback from course attendees and a number of women across the business have since expressed their interest in attending any future courses.

Aims –

  •  To develop an understanding of workplace perception within female managers.
  •  To increase confidence and effectiveness within female managers to aspire to be future leaders in business.
  •  To help individuals recognise and overcome potential barriers so that they can develop and excel as leaders.

Approach –      

  • Designed specifically to meet the demands of life in construction as a woman; the course covered the essentials of leadership, progression and communication using examples, systems and experience that enabled participants to apply it to their own personal roles and achieve their ambitions.

Outcome

  • ISG acknowledged that helping female managers to understand more about how they relate to their workplace and how their workplace relates to them would increase effectiveness in their roles and their commitment to the organisation; improving motivation, morale and, ultimately, productivity. They also recognised that there was a very strong need and desire for this type of training when they saw the strength of the feedback, as well as the take-up.

Testimonial

  • The women who attended the two day programme were unanimous in their resoundingly positive response to the course and the power they felt following their experiences:

 

  • “I think this course was excellent, it really opened my eyes to opportunities as well as potential obstacles. It should be given a wider roll out”

 

  • “Made me reflect on my current position and think about my future and how I can get there through behavioural changes and confidence building”

 

  • “The whole course was very informative, lots to take away and digest”

 

  •  “I now understand that my actions may not necessarily be perceived in the way I intend but I now I have the tools to remedy this”